//
archives

Book Reviews

This tag is associated with 12 posts

‘Major Barbara’ by George Bernard Shaw

It is the Undershaft inheritance. I shall hand on my torch to my daughter. She shall make my converts and preach my gospel – George Bernard Shaw is rarely easy and never simple. He continually pushed boundaries and tested limits, and his 1905 play ‘Major Barbara’ is no exception. Set against the backdrop of Edwardian … Continue reading

My Week in Books (28/10/12)

This week’s selections . . . Peter Pan; or The Boy Who Would Not Grow Up by J.M. Barrie On my reading list for university class on Edwardian fiction. More sinister than the Disney film allows. Reading the original play was definitely an eye-opener. Journey by Moonlight by Antal Szerb A totally new writer for … Continue reading

‘Journey by Moonlight’ by Antal Szerb

Some weeks ago, whilst pulling more books I don’t have time to read out of the library, I happened to glance up and notice this novel. It was the author’s name that caught my eye. I’m a sucker for foreign or unusual sounding names. I had until that point never heard of Antal Szerb, or … Continue reading

J. C. Conway on Science Fiction and studying the craft of writing

The blogsphere is literally exploding with talented writers and poets, very few of whom get the attention they deserve. INTERVIEWS will introduce you to a new generation of writers and thinkers. So watch this space, who knows what you’ll find . . . Science Fiction, fantasy and romance writer J. C. Conway talks about military … Continue reading

‘The History of Mr Polly’ by H.G. Wells

Have you ever had that moment? You might be sitting at your desk, cooking tea for your kids, driving to work – and suddenly you think ‘Is this it? Is this all there is?’ It is at this precise moment that we crash land into the life of one Mr. Alfred Polly: draper, dreamer and … Continue reading

‘The Wind in the Willows’ by Kenneth Grahame

‘Really, Rat,’ said the Mole quite pettishly, ‘I think we’ve had enough of this folly. Who ever heard of a doormat telling anyone anything? They simply don’t do it. They are not that sort at all. Doormats know their place.’ The indelible outline of Rat, Mole, Toad and Badger is sketched so keenly on my … Continue reading

‘Rivers of London’ by Ben Aaronovitch

Prepare for magic, mayhem and the newest officer of Met. Ben Aaronvitch’s ‘Rivers of London’ follows probationary officer Peter Grant, who is saved from an impeding future as a desk-jockey for the London Metropolitan police, when he accidentally finds the only witness of a bloody murder in Covent Gardens. There’s one problem however. The witness … Continue reading

‘The Professor’ by Charlotte Bronte

‘The Professor’ is a book largely forgotten by the reading public, despite it being Charlotte Brontë’s first work. Written before ‘Jane Eyre’, it was not published until after her death. It carries all the hallmarks of an early and somewhat flawed text, however this alone was not the reason for its rejection from publishers. Meet … Continue reading

‘Basil’ by Wilkie Collins

I am now about to relate the story of an error, innocent in its beginning, guilty in its progress, fatal in its results . . . Opening my fourth year course in ‘Madness and Sexuality in Victorian Literature’, the first book I encountered was Wilkie Collins’ Basil. Though better known for his classic works The … Continue reading

‘The Passion of New Eve’ by Angela Carter

I know nothing. I am tabula erasa, a blank sheet of paper, an unhatched egg. I have not yet become a woman, although I possess a woman’s shape. Not a woman, no: both more and less than a real woman. Now I am as mythic and monstrous as Mother herself; but I cannot bring myself … Continue reading

Follow The Thiessen Review

Photobucket Photobucket Photobucket

Currently Reading . . .

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 596 other followers